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MUSE Meets 2021 April 27-30


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Welcome to MUSE Meets 2021!

April 27-30, 2021

Please join us for MUSE Meets 2021, happening April 27-30th, a virtual gathering focused on not-for-profit scholarly publishing in the humanities and social sciences. This free event expands on the tradition of Project MUSE’s annual meeting of participating publishers, and builds upon our celebration of MUSE’s 25th anniversary under the theme of “Envision What’s Next.”

In addition to delivering an informative and educational meeting for our publishers, we are excited to augment our programming with global community sessions that invite participation from our library partners and other stakeholders in scholarly communications. We feel it is vital, now more than ever, to encourage dialogue among the library, scholar, and publishing communities, so we can work together to envision a sustainable future. Registration for the event is free to all, as we want to ensure equitable participation for any who wish to join the conversation.


Registration

Space is limited, so RSVP here by April 23, 2021 to reserve your spot at the virtual event!


Schedule

Tuesday, April 27, 2021 (all welcome)

4:00pm-5:00pm EDT

  • Opening Comments and Keynote Speaker
    • Wendy Queen, Director, Project MUSE
    • Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Digital Humanities and Professor of English, Michigan State University
    • Description

      Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Director of Digital Humanities and Professor of English at Michigan State University, where she also directs MESH, a research and development unit focused on the future of scholarly communication. She is project director of Humanities Commons, an open-access, open-source network serving more than 23,000 scholars and practitioners across the humanities and around the world, and she is author of Generous Thinking: A Radical Approach to Saving the University (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019), Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011), and The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006). She is president of the Association for Computers and the Humanities, and she is a member of the board of directors of the Council on Library and Information Resources and of the Educopia Institute.

      Kathleen will talk about what’s next for our humanities communities post pandemic in leadership decision making, collective actions, building better shared infrastructures, and increasing equity of access to content with plenty of time for audience Q&A.

Wednesday, April 28, 2021 (all welcome)

10:00am-11:15am EDT

  • Panel Discussion: "Envision What's Next: Perspective from Publishers, Librarians, and Scholarly Publishing Stakeholders"
    • Greg Eow, President, Center for Research Libraries
    • Celeste Feather (moderator), Senior Director of Content and Scholarly Communication Initiatives, LYRASIS
    • Sylvester Johnson, Professor and Director of the Center for Humanities, Virginia Tech
    • Liz Mengel, Associate Director of Collections & Academic Services, Sheridan Libraries, Johns Hopkins University
    • Frances Pinter, Executive Chair, Central European University Press
    • Karin Wulf, Professor of History and Director of the Omohundro Institute, William & Mary
    • Description

      What are the urgent issues facing publishers and librarians? What threats and opportunities will shape the future of digital publishing in the humanities and social sciences? What areas call for better communication and shared understanding? What's next for Project MUSE? While 2020 challenged us in ways we never expected, it has been a powerful reminder that we are all in this together. Every voice in the scholarly publishing community has value, and we are strongest when we work together to envision the future and ensure the growth of digital humanities and social science content for years to come. This panel of experts from across the digital publishing ecosystem will discuss these important questions and ideas generated in the pre-meeting brainstorm https://projectmuse.ideascale.com/. Celeste Feather, Senior Director of Content and Scholarly Communication Initiatives for LYRASIS, will kick off and moderate this discussion with plenty of time for audience Q&A.

11:30am-12:30pm EDT

  • Breakout Sessions (passcode and preregistration required)
    • Description

      The virtual breakout rooms are an opportunity to continue the conversations presented at the panel discussion in small group settings. Network with publishing colleagues from across the globe, meet new people, and learn something new! Space is limited, so be sure to indicate your interest on your Eventbrite RSVP.


Thursday, April 29, 2021 (participating publishers only; passcode required)

Presentations for Publishers: 10:00am-3:30pm EDT

10:00am-10:20am EDT

  • Welcome & 2020 in Review
    • Kelley Squazzo, Director of Publisher Relations, Project MUSE
    • Description

      Kelley will kick off the publishers’ day with a look back at 2020 at Project MUSE. Our 25 years of commitment to the continuity and growth of our platform did not waiver last year. But we were challenged to rethink how content is discovered, accessed, and used by each of our customer segments: publisher, librarian, researcher, and instructor. By reexamining how users are accessing digital content, we were able to leverage our flexible technology, the vast reach of the MUSE platform, and our deep knowledge of the markets we serve to better support the scholarly community in a time of crisis. Kelley will talk about the freed content period on MUSE at the start of the pandemic, new programs and content launched, how MUSE insured uninterrupted access, and content area growth plans for the future.

10:30am-11:20am EDT

  • What's Next for Books
    • Phillip Hearn, Sr. Content Development Coordinator, Project MUSE
    • Description

      2021 is a year of new beginnings for the Project MUSE books program. In this session, Phil Hearn will introduce our new Custom Collections model, which will be launching in time for our 2022 sales year. The new model completely reinvents how collections of backlist titles are packaged and sold on MUSE, offering robust collection customization options to libraries while providing more clarity and control to publishers on how collections are packaged and priced. Clearing the groundwork for this was an update to our publisher book agreements, better laying out our range of sales models so that it is easier for publishers to set-and-forget their single title sales preferences. Phil will address the highlights of this new agreement and how they position Project MUSE and participating book publishers to grow their revenue and usage on the platform. Outside of our sales models, MUSE Open continues to grow. Phil will provide updates on OA book publishers and the innovative models pushing us toward a more open future.

11:30am-12:20pm EDT

  • What's Next for Journals
    • Elizabeth Brown, Publisher Relations Manager, Project MUSE
    • Description

      Are you getting the most from your Project MUSE journals participation? Join Liz Brown for this session to make sure---and MUSE book publishers also welcome!

      Liz will cover the latest news about MUSE journals, including the successful launch this past fall of MUSE’s “re-visioned” hosted journals program. Publishers can now take advantage of streamlined fees for hosted journals (no more article processing fees!), more robust sales support for single title subscriptions (for both hosting AND collection journals), and new XML ingestion tools (coming soon to our current production workflows).

      As always, publishers will learn in this session how to take advantage of MUSE tools and services to maximize the reach of their journals---but in the context of a new post-pandemic world. Liz will also include a deep dive into key issues such as open access and maintaining journal usage in this new world.

      So, what’s next? More journal content. More ways to disseminate journal content and reach the right audiences. And much, much more!

1:00pm-1:50pm EDT

  • Leveraging Your Book Metadata to Optimize Product Outcomes
    • Kelly Swickard, Metadata & Linked Data Strategist, Project MUSE
    • Helen MacDiarmid, eBook Production Coordinator, Project MUSE
    • Description

      This session will discuss the importance of metadata and its direct effect on discovery, access, and book sales. Kelly and Helen will give an overview of how MUSE ingests the data and subsequent work-processes. Additionally, the presentation will demonstrate how the data exists not only in MUSE but also flows to discovery partners and thusly customers. Helen and Kelly will provide insights on the metadata template fields and give best practice recommendations.

2:00pm-2:50pm EDT

  • Virtual Connections Across the Globe: Sales and Marketing in the Age of COVID
    • Melanie Schaffner, Director, Sales and Marketing, Project MUSE
    • Ann Snoeyenbos, Manager of International Sales and Special Markets, Project MUSE
    • Description

      Melanie will begin this segment speaking about content-focused marketing and the challenges and successes making virtual connections with customers. She will also talk about the 2021 journals renewals season, how MUSE responded at the start of the pandemic, and what we learned about trends in books sales. Ann will speak in the second half of the session about international sales activity during the pandemic as well as overall trends impacting higher education institutions and libraries around the globe. She will share case studies from specific regions and countries to help the audience understand how library purchasing is impacted by a variety of political and economic factors.

3:00pm-3:30pm EDT

  • Envisioning What's Next and Closing Remarks
    • Wendy Queen, Director, Project MUSE
    • Description

      To close out the publisher day’s programming, Wendy Queen will chart the path forward for Project MUSE, reflecting on how the challenges of 2020 and our quick adjustments to face them have positioned us to continue innovating to serve the global scholarly community. Wendy will detail how developments to sustain the continued growth of our journals and books programs, new experiments in Open Access, investments in technology and research, and harnessing over 25 years of expertise as a leader in the digital humanities space will ensure that “what’s next” is even greater than what came before.


Friday, April 30, 2021 (all welcome)

10:00am-11:15 EDT

  • Panel Discussion: "Community Challenges, Collaborative Solutions: Emerging Library Trends for Publishers"
    • Lindsay Cronk, Head of Collection Strategies and Scholarly Communication, University of Rochester
    • Laura Mesotten, Process Manager Research and Open Scholarship, KU Leuven Libraries
    • Jaclyn Parrott, Assistant Professor and Collection Management Librarian, Eastern Washington University Libraries and Learning Commons
    • Melanie Schaffner (moderator), Director, Sales and Marketing, Project MUSE
    • Maurice York, Director of Library Initiatives, Big Ten Academic Alliance
    • Description

      For over 25 years, Project MUSE has been an integral partner in responding to challenges through collaborative solutions and bridging our participating publishers to the library market. This panel of experts offers an opportunity for publishers to hear directly from libraries about how they are responding to some of the most significant shared challenges in our collective space and for librarians to hear from colleagues about creative approaches being utilized. Melanie Schaffer, Director of Sales and Marketing for Project MUSE, will kick off and moderate this discussion with plenty of time for audience Q&A.


Presenters & Panelists

Elizabeth W. Brown

Publisher Relations Manager, Project MUSE

Liz Brown currently runs the Project MUSE Publisher Relations team’s journals program, including licensing journals, anticipating publishers’ needs, and developing new journal programs and business models. With a background as an academic librarian, she has worked for Project MUSE since 1998, first at the Sheridan Libraries at JHU then with the JHU Press since 2001; during this time, she transitioned from library-facing to publisher-facing roles at MUSE. She has previously held positions in libraries at Rutgers University, University of Michigan, Harvard University, and the Georgia Institute of Technology.


Lindsay Cronk

Director, Collection Strategies and Scholarly Communications, University of Rochester

Lindsay Cronk has spent nearly a decade in librarianship, first in consortia and now in academia, honing an approach to service and strategy that is data-driven, dynamic, and grounded in the pursuit of social justice. She believes that libraries are engines for knowledge creation and democratization, and that as such library workers have a leadership role to play in discussions of the research enterprise. She is currently engaged in that effort at the University of Rochester River Campus Libraries where she works extensively in coordination with fellow NERL institutions and recently co-authored the consortium’s first public statement, “NERL Demands a Better Deal.”

Michael Arthur, Head, Resource Acquisition & Discovery at The University of Alabama, calls Lindsay an “innovator and boundary-pusher” and leading library technologist, Andromeda Yelton says she does the job with “Midwestern friendliness and sledgehammer directness.” She considers her creativity in developing practical solutions her central library competency. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0677-8118


Greg Eow

President, Center for Research Libraries

Greg Eow is President of the Center for Research Libraries, responsible for setting strategic directions and overall CRL programming and services in collaboration with the CRL Board of Directors, CRL staff, CRL member libraries, and CRL strategic partners. Before joining the Center for Research Libraries in 2019, he served as the Associate Director for Collections at the MIT Libraries, where he led an administrative portfolio that included scholarly communications and collections strategy, digital preservation, acquisitions and metadata creation, and the Institute Archives and Special Collections. Eow has held previous appointments as Charles Warren Bibliographer at the Harvard Library and as Kaplanoff Librarian for American History at the Yale University Library. Eow currently serves on the Management Board of the MIT Press as well as the Board of Directors of the Chicago Collections Consortium. He is a member of the American Historical Association.


Celeste Feather

Senior Director of Content and Scholarly Communication Initiatives, LYRASIS

Celeste Feather is the Senior Director of Content and Scholarly Communication Initiatives at LYRASIS, where she leads a team of experts who negotiate group licenses for online content, manage persistent identifier communities, and work with mission-aligned partners to develop new models for scholarly communication. Prior to joining LYRASIS in 2010, she gained expertise through a variety of positions at university libraries and a statewide library consortium. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5907-7606


Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Director of Digital Humanities and Professor of English, Michigan State University

Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Director of Digital Humanities and Professor of English at Michigan State University, where she also directs MESH, a research and development unit focused on the future of scholarly communication. She is project director of Humanities Commons, an open-access, open-source network serving more than 23,000 scholars and practitioners across the humanities and around the world, and she is author of Generous Thinking: A Radical Approach to Saving the University (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019), Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011), and The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006). She is president of the Association for Computers and the Humanities, and she is a member of the board of directors of the Council on Library and Information Resources and of the Educopia Institute. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5251-0307


Phillip Hearn

Sr. Content Development Coordinator, Project MUSE

Phil Hearn has been with Project MUSE since 2011, when he joined the production team during the initial launch of books on the platform. As Ebook Production Coordinator, Phil worked closely with participating book publishers to guide tens of thousands of books through the MUSE production process. In 2018, he joined the Publisher Relations team, where he focuses on books in his current role.


Sylvester Johnson

Associate Vice Provost for the Humanities and Director of the Center for Humanities, Virginia Tech

Sylvester A. Johnson is Assistant Vice Provost for the Humanities and Executive Director of the “Tech for Humanity” initiative at Virginia Tech. He is the founding director of Virginia Tech’s Center for Humanities, which is supporting human-centered research and humanistic approaches to the guidance of technology. Sylvester’s research has examined religion, race, and empire in the Atlantic world; religion and sexuality; national security practices; and the impact of intelligent machines and human enhancement on human identity and race governance. He is currently writing a book on human identity in an age of intelligent machines and human-machine symbiosis.


Helen MacDiarmid

eBook Production Coordinator, Project MUSE

Helen MacDiarmid trained as an archivist, and has worked at small and large repositories making collections available to researchers. She joined Project MUSE in 2019 as the eBook Production Coordinator. Her understanding of metadata and attention to detail facilitates the movement of assets across the information ecosystem, and she endeavors to gain maximum exposure for publishers’ scholarly books. Helen has a Master of Library Science with a specialization in archiving from the University of Maryland and a Master of Art History from American University.


Liz Mengel

Associate Director Collections & Academic Services, Johns Hopkins University Sheridan Libraries

Liz Mengel serves on the Libraries’ senior management team. She supports a team that includes everything from art collections to digitization. She has been at JHU since 2001 where she started as a science and engineering librarian. She has been actively engaged in collections development and management from both a practitioner’s standpoint and that of broader strategic institutional values perspective. Active in library assessment, she has presented on library value and measures. Prior to joining Johns Hopkins, she held positions at Rice University and Shell Oil Company (Houston, TX). She holds a BA in Art History from the University of Houston and an MLS from the University of North Texas. She has completed 1 marathon and now only runs short distances for fun. In addition to running, she is an avid golfer, tennis player, and a mighty fine cook.


Laura Mesotten

Process Manager Research and Open Scholarship, KU Leuven Libraries

Laura Mesotten works as Process Manager Research and Open Scholarship for KU Leuven Libraries Artes. Artes is the department within KU Leuven Libraries that manages and develops services and collections for research and education for the Faculty of Arts and, more generally, the Humanities and Social Sciences Group. Laura’s job focus is on scholarly communication and open science and she is a strong believer in Fair Open Access. Together with Demmy Verbeke, she is responsible for the day-to-day management of the KU Leuven Fund for Fair OA. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1186-1506


Jaclyn Parrott

Assistant Professor and Collection Management Librarian, Eastern Washington University Libraries and Learning Commons

Jaclyn has been serving as Assistant Professor, Collection Management Librarian, and Religious Studies Subject Liaison at EWU Libraries and Learning Commons since 2018. Previously, she spent five years as Branch Librarian and Manager at Moody Bible Institute-Spokane Library. Besides an extensive customer service and leadership background, she has experience in all aspects of librarianship, including administration, reference, instruction, cataloging, acquisitions, technology, outreach, and access services. Currently, she manages the collections budget, resources, and personnel in the Collection Services Unit at EWU.

She earned an MDiv from Moody Theological Seminary, a Professional Librarian’s Life Certificate, an MLISc from University of Hawai’i, and a BA in Communication Studies (with a Business Administration minor) from Eastern Washington University.

Besides a passion for education, she enjoys recreating in the outdoors, traveling, reading, music, riding her motorcycle, taking pictures, and spending time with her Springerdoodle Fyodor, friends, and family.


Frances Pinter

Executive Chair, Central European University Press

Dr Frances Pinter is the Executive Chair of the Central European University Press and formerly CEO of Manchester University Press. She was the founding Publisher of Bloomsbury Academic. She is also the founder of Knowledge Unlatched, taking a particular interest in developing sustainable business models for Open Access monographs. Previously she was Publishing Director at the Open Society Foundation. Earlier she founded Pinter Publishers that also owned Leicester University Press and established the imprint Belhaven Press.


Wendy Queen

Director, Project MUSE

Wendy Queen is the Director of Project MUSE at Johns Hopkins University Press. She began her career focusing on the intersection of human interaction and technology. With a background in the humanities and a Masters in Information Arts and Technologies, Wendy first joined MUSE in a technical role. Through the years and many positions at MUSE, her leadership and contributions have ensured that MUSE continues to innovate across its platform and business models for the benefit of its partner publishers. Wendy has served on boards and committees for COUNTER, AAP, CrossRef, NISO, and ALPSP. She serves on the Scholarly Communications Group at Johns Hopkins University and is a member of the executive leadership at JHU Press. Wendy has served as a PI on grants from Mellon and the NEH as well as served as an advisor and reviewer of numerous grant proposals.


Melanie Schaffner

Director, Sales and Marketing, Project MUSE

Melanie Schaffner has been with Project MUSE since 1996, and currently leads the teams responsible for the strategic development, planning, and implementation of all sales and marketing activities for the organization. She has over thirty years of marketing, communications, and business development experience across several categories of intellectual property. Melanie holds a Bachelor of Science from the University of Maryland Baltimore County and a Master of Science from Johns Hopkins University. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3662-7978


Ann Snoeyenbos

Manager, International Sales and Special Markets, Project MUSE

Ann Snoeyenbos has worked at Project MUSE in this role since 2004. Her responsibilities include Book and journal collection sales to academic libraries outside of US/Canada, as well as sales to schools, special and public libraries worldwide. Before joining Project MUSE Ann was Librarian for West European Social Science at New York University. Ann holds an MA in West European Studies, and an MLS in Library Science, both from Indiana University Bloomington.


Kelley Squazzo

Director of Publisher Relations, Project MUSE

Kelley Squazzo joined Project MUSE as Director of Publisher Relations & Content Development in 2019. Kelley previously held positions at JHUP as acquisitions editor for public health and at Wolters Kluwer as executive editor for nursing education. In her role at MUSE, she brings expertise in scholarly publishing strategies including open access, digital humanities, and e-learning solutions. Kelley holds a Master of Arts in English Literature from the University of Maryland.


Kelly Swickard

Metadata & Linked Data Strategist, Project MUSE

Kelly Swickard is the Metadata & Linked Data Strategist. She has worked for over ten years as an academic librarian doing cataloging, metadata, resource description, reference and instruction, and digital archives. She has graduate degrees in archaeology, art history, and library and information science. Swickard believes strongly in the importance of good metadata as the foundation of sharing knowledge. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3197-2932


Karin Wulf

Professor of History and Director of the Omohundro Institute, William and Mary

Karin Wulf is the director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, which has been publishing the William and Mary Quarterly, the leading journal in early American scholarship, and books with the University of North Carolina Press, since 1943. She is also Professor of History at the College of William & Mary, and co-chair the College’s Neurodiversity Working Group. Her scholarship focuses on women, gender and family in the early modern British Atlantic. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1414-7591


Maurice York

Director of Library Initiatives, Big Ten Academic Alliance

As the Director of Library Initiatives for the Big Ten Academic Alliance, Maurice is responsible for coordinating collective action at scale amongst the research libraries of the BTAA towards their commitment to realizing an interdependent, networked future. The central initiative in Maurice's portfolio is the BIG Collection, a comprehensive strategy to strengthen an interdependent future for the 15 world-class research libraries of the BTAA by joining the separate collections into one collection, shared and fully networked, across all physical and digital domains.

In his previous position, Maurice was on the executive leadership team at the University of Michigan Library, where he led the technology division in developing and delivering cornerstone digital infrastructure projects for information discovery, digital preservation, and access. Before Michigan, Maurice was the Head of Information Technology at the NC State University Library, where he designed and led the implementation of the technology program for the James B. Hunt Jr. Library.


Contact Us

Please email Kelley Squazzo at ksquazzo.muse@jhu.edu with any questions.


Code of Conduct

Project MUSE is committed to promoting the principles of Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (EJI). These values are intrinsic to our mission of serving the global academic and scholarly community, and as a virtual gathering of that community, MUSE Meets 2021 will foster an environment where diversity, dignity, and integrity are central to each interaction. While we encourage spirited and free intellectual discussions throughout this event, all such interactions must take place in the spirit of mutual respect and empathy.

To ensure that MUSE Meets 2021 is a positive and rewarding event for all panelists and attendees, we offer this Code of Conduct, adapted in part from the AUPresses Code of Conduct. Any conduct that runs counter to the principles of EJI or in any way threatens the safety or dignity of another participant will have their access revoked immediately.

Prohibited behaviors may include but are not limited to:

  • Offensive or harassing behavior or language based on group status, including but not limited to race, ethnic background, national origin, age, religion, disability or medical condition, gender expression or identity, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, appearance, occupation or professional status, or veteran status;
  • Sexual harassment, including unwelcome attention, stalking (physical or virtual), and non-consensual physical contact;
  • Abusive, biased, or disrespectful conduct that has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with another person’s ability to participate in the event;
  • Real or implied threats of physical or professional harm.

We thank all members of the Project MUSE community for making MUSE Meets 2021 a respectful, positive, professional event where scholarly communication can flourish.


Land Acknowledgment

Project MUSE respectfully acknowledges and gives thanks to the Piscataway Tribe, the Indigenous people who are traditional owners of the lands of the Chesapeake Bay region. We also acknowledge all Indigenous Peoples, the traditional owners of the lands and waters of the United States of America.


Archive of Past Meetings